Monthly Archives: January 2014

“Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.”

– Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change This quote was brought up today in class. I have to disagree wholeheartedly. First, who does not understand what they are meaning to reply … Continue reading

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Marc Prensky, “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants,” or, getting my “digital natives” rant out of the way now.

This article makes an appeal to educators to accept that the students they teach are different from those of the past, mainly because of the introduction of computer technology into the everyday lives of those students at an early age. … Continue reading

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Stephen Ramsay, “Writing as Programming as Writing”

Ramsay and Rockwell’s animation of a dialogue makes arguments for and against considering computer coding and programming as language/text/writing. Ultimately, I agree with the idea that it is language, because it is communicative (regardless of its constriction), it is governed … Continue reading

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Leah Price, “You Are What You Read”

Price takes down the NEA’s report, “to read or not to read,” which draws correlation between readers and those who are fit, active, happy,  kinder, better citizens. However, the report narrows reading to reading for “literary experience,” excluding reading done … Continue reading

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Daily Create #2: If I am what I read, I am digital.

I am what I read because I am digital. I am digital, so I read digital, which makes me digital, so I read digital….and so on.

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Matthew Kirschenbaum, “How has technology changed writing and literature?”

On some awful video software, Kirschenbaum traces the history of the introduction of computers into writers’ practices of composing and editing mostly works of what would be considered “literature”–fiction, screenplays, etc. Word processing software met with some resistance, was considered … Continue reading

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Robert Darnton, “Google and the Future of Books”

Darnton somewhat utopianly considers the issue of access to digitized books, especially in light of the 2009ish settlement between Google books and copyright holders in creating a potential monopoly on access. He considers the legacy of the enlightenment, and it’s … Continue reading

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Daily Create #1: GPOY

My relationship to technology on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/alyssaraehug/gpoy/

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Rebecca Davis and Jen Rajchel, “Digital Humanities and the Undergrad”

“This is what it must feel like to do real scholarship”; experimentation and collaboration; the professor willing to show how they deal with failure; learning about word choice and etymology, the links between past and present texts, and pulling together … Continue reading

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Patricia Cohen, Humanities 2.0 #6: “Digital Maps are Giving Scholars the Historical Lay of the Land”

This last article introduces the spatial humanities, or humanists who consider geographical and physical space and its effect on and its own history, especially using DH tools. This allows for new cultural questions to be asked about context. Cohen, Patricia. … Continue reading

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